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Trump says blame for Virginia violence belongs 'on many sides' (w/video)

President Donald Trump said blame for violence by white supremacists in Charlottesville, Va., belongs "on many sides," just after authorities confirmed that at least one person had died in an attack earlier in the day by a car.

The president's statement Saturday, from his golf club in New Jersey, is sure to inflame criticism that already had built over two days as he first was silent on Ku Klux Klan-led protests and then made two posts on Twitter that generically condemned hate without citing any groups.

"We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry, and violence on many sides, on many sides," Trump said.

RELATED COVERAGE: One dead after car crashes into counter protest to Virginia white nationalist rally

"What is vital now is a swift restoration of law and order and the protection of innocent lives," he said.

Trump's appearance had been previously scheduled to highlight his work for veterans and on the economy. The president mostly dealt with those topics during the event, which lasted just over 10 minutes. After a short statement on Charlottesville, he talked about the economy and greeted veterans, before leaving without answering questions.

Among the questions he ignored Saturday was, "Do you want the support of these white nationalists?" Another asked whether the violence should be considered terrorism.

©2017 Los Angeles Times

A vehicle reverses after driving into a group of protesters demonstrating against a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va., Saturday, Aug. 12, 2017. The nationalists were holding the rally to protest plans by the city of Charlottesville to remove a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. There were several hundred protesters marching in a long line when the car drove into a group of them. [Ryan M. Kelly | Daily Progress via AP]

A vehicle reverses after driving into a group of protesters demonstrating against a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va., Saturday, Aug. 12, 2017. The nationalists were holding the rally to protest plans by the city of Charlottesville to remove a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. There were several hundred protesters marching in a long line when the car drove into a group of them. [Ryan M. Kelly | Daily Progress via AP]

Trump says blame for Virginia violence belongs 'on many sides' (w/video) 08/12/17 [Last modified: Saturday, August 12, 2017 6:06pm]
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