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Rick Scott

Richard Lynn Scott

    Rick Scott is a Republican elected governor of Florida in 2010. He defeated Democrat Alex Sink, the state's chief financial officer, in the closest governor's race since 1876. He also spent $73 million of his own money to introduce himself to Floridians, having no political experience and barely met residency requirements.

    Rick Scott is the former CEO of Columbia/HCA and also started Solantic. Scott was born Dec. 1, 1952, in Bloomington, Ill. He served in the Navy and graduated from the University of Missouri-Kansas City and Southern Methodist University Law School. He and his wife, Frances Annette, have two adult daughters.

    

    1. 1 in 4 Florida adults aren't registered to vote, according to nonpartisan group

      Legislature

      TALLAHASSEE — Nearly 5 million people in Florida who are eligible to vote aren't registered, according to a nationwide nonpartisan group that helps improve the accuracy of state voter rolls.

      Voters line up in front of the Coliseum in St. Petersburg on Nov. 8. A nonpartisan group estimates that more than a quarter of Florida’s adult-age population isn’t registered to vote.
    2. Lost Highway: As FHP struggles to recruit, speeding tickets plummet

      State Roundup

      TALLAHASSEE — The number of speeding tickets written by Florida state troopers has plunged as the agency grapples with a personnel shortage and high turnover.

      State data shows FHP troopers are not writing violations for speeding or other infractions like they did back in 2011, even though there's 1 million more licensed drivers in Florida.
    3. Rick Scott signs package of tax breaks

      State Roundup

      TALLAHASSEE — Gov. Rick Scott signed a tax cut package Thursday that — while vastly scaled back from what he wanted — eliminates the so-called "tampon tax" and offers tax holidays for back-to-school shoppers and Floridians preparing for hurricane season.

      Florida Governor Rick Scott signed a tax cut package that will cost state coffers $91.6 million during the upcoming year. [Joe Raedle | Getty Images]
    4. New DEP secretary says there's no conflict in political side businesses

      News

      TALLAHASSEE — When Noah Valenstein, the newly appointed head of the Department of Environmental Protection, was applying in April to be the state's top environmental regulator, he left one thing off the application: Companies he started and his wife runs have been paid nearly $1 million by politicians and lobbying …

       Noah Valenstein got the job as secretary of the Department of Environmental Protection on Tuesday May 23rd, on a unanimous vote by Gov. Rick Scott and the Cabinet. He will take the helm on June 5, with a salary of $150,000 per year. [Florida Governor's Office]
    5. Gov. Rick Scott's family history of alcohol abuse could decide 'liquor wall' bill

      Legislature

      TALLAHASSEE — Gov. Rick Scott must decide Wednesday whether to let Walmart and other big-box stores sell liquor, and he says a factor in his decision is the history of alcohol abuse in his family.

      Florida Governor Rick Scott is considering a veto of a bill that would allow Walmart, Target and other big box retail stores to sell liquor. [Andres Leiva | Tampa Bay Times]
    6. John Morgan 'prepared to invest $100M' in medical marijuana

      State Roundup

      John Morgan spent nearly $7 million pushing two statewide ballot initiatives to expand medical marijuana throughout the state of Florida.

      Personal injury lawyer John Morgan says he’s ready to put up to $100 million in “the right opportunities.’’
    7. For Gov. Rick Scott, 'fighting' could mean vetoing entire state budget

      State Roundup

      Every day, Gov. Rick Scott is getting a lot of advice.

      The last time a Florida governor vetoed the education portion of the state budget was in 1983. Gov. Bob Graham blasted fellow Democrats for their “willing acceptance of mediocrity.”
    8. Potential new laws further curb Floridians' right to government in the Sunshine

      State Roundup

      TALLAHASSEE — From temporarily shielding the identities of murder witnesses to permanently sealing millions of criminal and arrest records, state lawmakers did more this spring than they have in all but one of the past 22 years to chip away at Floridians' constitutional guarantees to access government records and …

      The Legislature passed 17 new exemptions to the Sunshine Law, according to a tally by the First Amendment Foundation.
    9. While Hillsborough, St. Pete colleges take a budget hit — public universities get more

      State Roundup

      TALLAHASSEE — As Senate President Joe Negron aims to make Florida's 12 public universities "elite" destinations, state lawmakers this spring voted to give an extra $232 million next year to those institutions — while simultaneously cutting $25 million that has helped the state's 28 state colleges serve …

      Florida Senate President Joe Negron talk to members in the chamber. [SCOTT KEELER | Tampa Bay Times].
    10. State Supreme Court rejects massive expansion of slot machines

      State Roundup

      TALLAHASSEE — In a major defeat for counties that wanted to authorize slot machines by referendum, the Florida Supreme Court on Thursday unanimously ruled that Florida counties have no legal authority to ask voters to approve slot machines at existing pari-mutuel race tracks or jai-alai frontons without …

      In 2008 about 800 Vegas-style slot machines were installed in the Seminole Hard Rock Casino and Hotel in Hollywood Florida. The Florida Supreme Court ruled Thursday against expanding the use of slot machines in parimutuels throughout Florida. [Willie J. Allen Jr. | Times]